Leadership Lessons form 200 CEO’s: 2018/19

Annually since 2013 I have surveyed over 200 CEO’s across the USA, Australia and New Zealand to seek feedback on two key questions relating to what they have learnt and what challenges they feel they face over the coming 12 months. This creates a huge amount of information which takes some time to distil down to the key patterns that show up across all the replies. It is also a very interesting document to read because these busy business leaders have taken the time to reflect and answer the questions.

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The trend over the last five years has been leading in constant change, the challenge of developing teams who have the resilience to thrive in uncertainty (created by constant change) and who can still achieve growth and a solid bottom line profit. There is much more awareness of the importance of a good culture of engagement and the need for governance, mentors and coaches to stay ahead of the crowd (competitors). I do note that the CEO’s surveyed tend to be those leading high performance companies that perform year on year despite market conditions and competitor moves so they are adaptable and already good at execution.

Question 1: What are the three biggest leadership lessons you have learnt in 2018?

  1. Culture & people have the biggest impact. Their skills, behaviours, diversity, ideas. The ability of our team/s to work together and to keep the clients at the centre of what we do in terms of high value products and services. No one can steal your culture.
  2. There is a need to move fast, make clear decisions & Execute. Know your numbers, focus, iterate the plan based on a good review process but stay the course to achieve success. Its less about the smartest ideas/plans and more about making important things happen i.e. executing.
  3. Trust yourself and your professional judgement. Back yourself to know the industry from your years of experience but be open to new ideas and ways. Make the big decisions, sleep on them, seek the best advice from those you trust & don’t over think it. But make good clear decisions, tell people why and then focus on making it happen.

Question 2: What are the three biggest challenges you will face as a leader in 2019?

  1. Finding the right people to allow the company to scale for growth. Recruiting, inducting, training and then being able to lead them well and retain the top people. It is tough to find the people with experience you need in many industries.
  2. Hitting growth targets in a tougher economy/market environment. There is a lot of change and uncertainty and in many markets there is more competition. Economic outlooks over the next 12 months are for a tighter market. The challenge of continuing to grow is very real.
  3. Taking time out to recharge. Finding time to rest, learn, study and have a good life balance when things move so quickly. There is more pressure to work longer hours and more days a week. The smartest leaders know it is a marathon and not a sprint so being balanced is needed to stay focussed, fresh and at the top of the game.

You can see the results of the 2017/18 survey here.

You can look back over a summary of the last five surveys here.

The lessons I personally learnt as a leader in 2018

I thank all those CEO’s who took the time to reflect and provide feedback.

Don’t Issue Orders, Give Intent

A fantastic video from David Marquet challenging us to move from a Leader-Follower to a Leader-Leader style of Leadership. This is what we learnt as Army Officers and this video along with David’s book called “Turn The Ship Around” is a great insight into how it can be applied in Business Culture today. It increases the pace of Execution and it unblocks thinking by creating an environment of constant learning.

As Tom Peters says “Leaders don’t create followers, Leaders create more Leaders” and with the pace of change we face in the immediate future and the changing workforce a collaborative style is needed. Gone are the days of Leaders being the smartest on the team having to know all the answers. How do you lead in constant change? In situations you or your team have not faced before? When change is so fast that systems and processes simply don’t keep up? Issue Intent, shape thinking, engage & empower others and try new things.

Sounds simple but its not. Leading other clever people is one of the ultimate challenges we face. How much time are you spending intentionally learning how to be better professional leader?

Find out more about Executive Leadership Coaching.

The RESULTS Group: Your Strategy Execution Partners”

 

 

The Lessons I have learnt as a CEO & Consultant to CEO’s in 2014

This year has been a very busy and professionally rewarding year. As a Company The RESULTS Group has grown and moved into a different area. Our core business as “The Business Execution Experts” has remained the same and we have proven our “5 Pillars” framework (Vision, Strategy, Engagement, Accountability and Cadence) across every industry and every sized company imaginable. Ranging from the small 20 person company, the family held medium sized company through to larger NZ & foreign listed Companies, Government organisations and into several big organisations with a Billion or more in revenue. From the straight forward to the incredibly complex, from construction to the professional services (law, accountancy, survey, HR, Banking) to the technical world of IT and fast growth IP.

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Ambiguity leads to mediocrity but then so too does continually benchmarking and being realistic.

 

Our consultants have been challenged and pushed as they have focussed on our purpose of “Making a Difference” and ensuring our clients get the clarity so they they can execute their plans and lead change. It has been a year of change for us as a company and we have truly lived our core value “Live What we Teach” as we have sought to execute our own plan in amongst the busyness that “Business as Usual” presents. We have had to challenge ourselves to focus on the important rather than just the urgent which is the constant challenge of every CEO. So what have been my big lessons across 2014 as a Consultant, Executive Leadership Coach and professional CEO? I keep a journal reflect on the work I do and what I have learnt most days which makes it easy to look back and to reflect on the important stuff over the year. In no particular order;

  • Better, faster, cheaper: These are  most common approaches that Companies have. These are not Strategies. Own the voice of your customer and look after them. Ask them often for feedback and listen to it. The magic will start.
  • Hope is also not a Strategy. You have to be deliberate and decisive in order to avoid being a victim of the market or dealt to by competitor moves.
  • A CEO adds at least 15% to the bottom line. (Research shared by Psychologist Dave Winsborough) by being inspirational, creating culture, expectations, a Vision and driving execution. The impact of good leadership is huge and measureable.
  • The number of senior leaders seeking to leave Corporates and the Public sector so they can have autonomy and so they can actually make a tangible difference is truly staggering!  A sense of purpose is critically important to people.
  • A lot can happen in a year. Good & bad. Roll your sleeves up and make good stuff happen.
  • CEO’s are often afraid to be human. The soft skills, the least talked about and trained for are the most important ones. Being able to be vulnerable, to make mistakes and learn from them……so important for leaders and so often missing.
  • Making clear and concise powerful decisions is often a missing skill. Making good decisions based on the best information at the time and backing yourself to alter them if they need it is a really critical skill especially in times of constant change. Just make a decision!
  • The potential talent pool in women leaders is massive. I feel this is one area that is truly undervalued. We created a woman leadership group this year to address and discuss this and have also included a woman speaker (Melissa Clark-Reynolds) at our John Spence” Leadership event planned for 25 March 2015 in Christchurch (Link here for details).
  • The value of having a massive network of people who you can support, ask for advice, learn from and add value to is truly priceless. I have so many people who support and contribute to our business and it is humbling to be able to support them in their roles and in their companies.
  • Any leader needs many mentors. Business and personal to grow in the complex world of modern business.
  • Formalising network Hubs or groups of people who can give you ongoing referrals and support is of high value.
  • John Spence taught me “you become like the 5 people you hang out with the most” Choose them carefully.
  • Hang out with those who know and ask a lot of questions. Learn from people with experience and acumen.
  • Lead from the front. Just lead and learn. People want to be led well. Make it a passion and never stop getting better at it.
  • As a CEO you need to make the big things happen. Get the rocks or cornerstones in place and make the things happen that move the Company in that direction happen. This is what CEO’s do.
  • Don’t seek to change people, seek to influence their activity, their behaviour and how they make their decisions. Seek to create an environment whereby they make consistently good decisions.
  • The art of reflecting and making clear observations and to be able to take an overview of the situation allows for better clarity. Practice it or have your team challenge you to do it.
  • Be tough. Firm, fair and consistent, but be tough in your standards and expectations of people. Be restless, seek excellence and constantly ask “Have I done enough?”. If the answer is no then step up and do more. Be the toughest on yourself……with power comes great responsibility.
  • Culture is king and Cash. No one can steal your culture. In fact thought leaders such as Tom Peters, Collin Powell, Richard Branson and John Spence all say that your culture is really your only truly defendable and significant point of difference. No one can steal it and if you get it right it will attract and retain top talent who in turn will look after your products, services and deliver excellent service to your clients. get that right and the magic begins!
  • Sadly in most companies the culture is just adhoc. No one plans it, discusses it and if they get it right it is by getting lucky. The best cultures in high performing companies are planned, a priority and protected by selecting only the best and by dealing with mediocrity very quickly. Leaving your company culture to luck means you are leaving a critical component of your “mission” success to chance.
  • Planning the year ahead in detail on a year planner (Sounds basic but try it) remains one of the activities that CEO’s rate as “most valuable”. Map out key dates, board meetings, reviews, training, holidays etc and plan the year ahead. Insist your team plans and gets clear around the year ahead.
  • Meetings are your number one leadership opportunity. Make them high value, fast, refer to good data/KPI’s and have fun. Most meetings in business today sap the energy from those who attend. Flip that around because leaders do people, leaders communicate and meetings are your number one opportunity to influence and live your culture.
  • Have more fun. Enjoy the ride. Its not a rehearsal.

Its been a big year and I have loved every minute of it. I’d like to thank my team and our awesome clients for everything. I can’t wait to be a part of the work we do in 2015 and all the challenge, fun and learning it will bring.

Keep safe out there.

Feedback from Over 200 CEO’s: What they Learnt in 2014 and the Challenges They Face in 2015

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Last year I went out to our Company network of Clients, thought leaders & Business leaders and asked them what they had learnt in 2013 and what they felt they would face in 2014. I was overwhelmed with the response and it took a lot to collate the feedback and to be able to articulate it. The resulting blog was one of my most read across 2014 (Link to it here).

This year I asked the same network (which of course has now grown quite extensively) the same questions. This includes Chief Executives of both publicly listed and privately held Companies across a vast range of industries. Mainly New Zealand and Australian Companies but also the USA and Canada. Some good friends (including John Spence) put it out to some of the Chief Executives in his North American network who also happily contacted me.  I also asked my wide Military network of leaders (many still serving & many leading organisations all over the globe) and included senior leaders from other Government Enterprises. During 2014 we also had ongoing feedback from over 1000 business leaders who attended our speaking and leadership training events. Many of these were introduced through ASB Business banking and partner relationships with other professional services leaders including Accountants, Legal Firms and Leadership and Strategy Consultants and some of the Business Bank staff themselves from both Westpac and ASB.

I got some fantastic feedback and I thank all those who put so much effort into answering the questions I posed. Many commented to me on just how valuable they found it to have a reason to sit down and reflect on 2014 and the year ahead. Many also realised just how busy they have been, how much change they have been leading and just how much they have achieved. I worked through all this feedback before rereading the blog I wrote in November 2013. There are similar themes around talent but it shows definitively that the rate of constant change has really started to increase. More so than in 2013. This is particularly so in Christchurch (post earthquake boom) but is also reflected across all markets, countries and is the new big challenge for Chief Executives regardless of the size of their organisation.

What were the Leadership Lessons you learnt in 2014 (and/or Observations you have made);

1.   “Change is Constant and is Both the Opportunity and the Challenge”: The Rate of Change is Increasing. Almost every respondent referred to the impact and effects of change and the challenge of getting things done (Execution). There is more change and it is constant. Leading through change is challenging and many referred to “expecting the unexpected” or the possibility that anything could happen (especially unplanned) and there was a need to iterate, be flexible and involve your people. To avoid stress the best method was learning “not to sweat the small stuff” or to “roll with it”. Self reflection was important as was having someone external who could help a leader to see the bigger picture and to take a more “unemotive” view point as to what was going on within their team/company. Planning was seen as important and doing more of it than ever before. Many feel it is important to develop new/better leadership skills to be able to lead change and to be able to get “stuff done”.

2.  “Technology and the Younger Generation of Workers is having a major Impact”: Technology change and innovation is now affecting all leaders in some way. New cloud based software applications and mobile smart phones (and devices) are allowing for better information. This brings the challenge of training to use them effectively, integrating different software solutions and needing the work force to have different skill sets. Talent is hard to find, attract and retain and they expect different things. Collaboration (and a sense of fairness) is how young, smart, technology savvy employees work and thrive and this is now starting to show across the board. Challenging top talent, encouraging innovation and new ideas and building a high performing culture is key to retaining top people.  On top of that, holding employees accountable to doing what they say they will do and getting them to consistently be highly productive has been a big challenge in 2014. Learning new leadership skills, building cultures that allow a “work/life” balance and training people has been a focus for many Chief Executives. Dealing with non performers is recognised as critical, most want to be better at it and have a desire to weed the “culture killers” out faster than they currently do. The challenge of growing as a “Leader” was referred to time and time again.

3. “What your Client Thinks and Says about your Company is Critical to Growth”: The last big theme to come through was reputation, brand strength and client loyalty. In an increasingly global economy and with the impact of social media, it is important to have people who love your products or services. Many Chief Executives referred to “getting cut through” in a busy market, being close to key clients and asking them regularly for feedback. It was generally accepted that print media is dead and that the future lies in the online, digital and social media space. Smart branding, immediate feedback (positive and negative) has a major impact on business growth. Most Chief Executives want to get better in this space, many are very involved and some (approximately on third of respondents) felt they would never catch up or get ahead of the change in this space. Many felt that getting their culture right and by having engaged and well trained people that clients would be taken care of and there was a desire to be able to canvas clients more easily (for feedback) and to measure it.

The next question I asked was “What are the challenges you feel you will face as a Leader in 2015?”

1.  “The challenge of finding, recruiting, training and retaining top people is the Number one Challenge”. By far the most respondents considered the challenge of getting good people to join and stay in their Company as the biggest challenge they feel they face in 2015. Making it happen, getting better at recruiting, identifying top performers and then leading them is considered to be a major development area for the future of their organisation.

2. “Leading in Uncertainty”. A big challenge in 2015 is being able to lead in uncertainty. How to lead young people, other leaders, people in their team who are smarter and more technology savvy during times of change & uncertainty is a concern of many respondents. Understanding how to motivate and lead when the way ahead is unclear or simply unknown is something may want to learn about. A fear of making big mistakes, a need for good advisers (Financial, Strategic, Governance) was a major theme as was the feeling that the leadership space is a lonely place. More mentors and people they can trust, as well as interaction with peers and other leaders in similar situations were identified as being of high value to them in 2015 and leading in the future. Delegating to others to get things done was also seen as being critical to growth in the year ahead as was getting closer to customers and planning at the operational and strategic level.

3. “Focus and Getting things Done”:  How to get “cut Through” or “focus” is seen as being more and more importance. 2015 will require more execution of the important things. Many want to spend more time planning and getting things done. Separating the “urgent from the important” is increasingly important to maximising production, resources and profitability. It is also getting increasingly harder to achieve. Focus on which customers to deal with, where and how to Market, what technology tools to invest in etc are all seen as key to getting really clear on what needs to be done. Then the challenge is to actually “make it happen”.

These were the main feedback areas that i have been able to collate. Of course there were hundreds of other comments, thoughts and reflections. Some themes that came through in not particular order;

  • A desire to have access to like minded networks of people.
  • Many are preparing for the next economic downturn and actively wanting to retain people & capability.
  • There were many who face the challenge of remaining profitable and competitive and the challenge of retaining and growing market share.
  • There were many facing succession challenges.
  • Getting better governance was a theme. Really valuable Board level advice.
  • More planning and third party reviews.
  • Specialist and generalist Leadership training is in high demand. In fact a recognised need for training in general is constant.
  • Learning to negotiate and lead in partnerships and in a more political (competitive) environment is needed by some.
  • Delegating and learning to trust.
  • Many Directors spoke of the need for them to get out of the way more. To let their people step up and own their roles.

Actions not words!

Overall this has been an interesting and humbling experience. It is a privilege to interact with clever and busy leaders and to hear their reflections and desires. It is useful for us as an organisation that “Leads Business Leaders” because in effect it helps us to deliver better high value services which will truly support and assist those who we work with. That said most of the stuff identified here does not cost a lot of money. In the main it requires a focus on some of the Leadership or “softer skills”. The ones that are least talked about and the least trained for. It requires some change to the way you may interact, spend your day as a Chief Executive or what you will measure and therefore manage.

So what have you learnt in 2014 and what do you think you will face in 2015? Are you planning to succeed? Are you doing enough to stay ahead of change, technology and do you really know what your clients think about you?

Have a happy and safe Christmas and New Year and a big thanks to all those who have offered their feedback and thoughts.

Leaders

Other stuff I you might like;

– Our social media wall which collates all our feeds and many other high values Leadership and Business resources. (Link Here)

– My Linkedin profile if you want to connect (Link here)

– Pride, Passion and Excellence. What I learnt from Anthony Leighs, CEO and Founder of Leighs Construction (link here)

Pride, Passion And Excellence: Leighs Construction CEO – Anthony Leighs

Last week we were lucky enough to have the CEO (and Founder) of Leighs Construction Ltd (Link here) speak at our CEO Leadership Group in Christchurch. Every two months the group gets together for breakfast to hear a Business Leader tell their personal story in Business, to tell their Leadership journey.

It is fantastic to hear someones journey in both Business and Leadership and to take a few things away to think about. What did I learn from Anthony? A lot actually;

  • His journey from school into the Construction Industry. A near brush with being an Officer in the NZ Army did threaten to take him in another direction & Leadership role.
  • He qualified as a QS, Project & Construction Manager and worked for a large Construction Company.
  • In his first role he was influenced by a strong leader who taught him a lot about Leading and running a Business.
  • He started his own Company.
  • Leighs Construction had to be smart, innovative and deliver great results to initially compete with larger, better established Christchurch Construction Companies.
  • Some early wins and awards made a big difference.
  • Being different is a way of building a brand. Leighs took construction to Antarctica, East timor and the Islands. This required innovation, flexibility and taught a culture of partnerships and close relationships. This ability to create and work in partnerships has been a major contributor to the Company growth.
  • His leadership philosophy is “Great people, Good equipment and sharing success”. The company has 3 stated Values – Pride, Passion, Excellence (PPE). The team keep this as centre to all they do and deliver. It is a way of doing business.
  • Anthony has tried to build a culture of performance. With PPE central in all they do, everyone is expected to perform.
  • Good robust Governance keeps the Business strong. Anthony wished he had formed a board earlier and gets invaluable direction, guidance and support from the Board of Directors he currently has.
  • Leading leaders is the challenge of the future a the company grows. How do you lead clever people well and develop them? Leadership is a key focus for the Company moving forward.
  • Anthony is passionate about what he does and his industry. He readily gives back through his role as Chairman of The NZ Masterbuilders Federation and by his numerous leadership roles in related groups, committees and Business relationships. He is an influencer.

Thank you for sharing your story. I learnt a lot and so did those attending the breakfast.

Other Leadership Blogs I have published:

Average Doesn’t work in Any Part of Life (lInk Here)

Feedback from 200 CEO’s: What They Learnt in 2013 (Link here)

Managing Director and Founder of Leigh Construction, Anthony Leighs speaks about Leadership at a Christchurch breakfast hosted by The Results group.
Managing Director and Founder of Leigh Construction, Anthony Leighs speaks about Leadership at a Christchurch breakfast hosted by The Results group.

Average Doesn’t Work in any Area of LIfe!

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I Love this quote from Grant Cardone. So many business leaders don’t inspire their Company and tribe (staff and end users of the product or service).  If you aren’t creating a culture and work environment that people really enjoy then you are missing a great opportunity. John Spence recently outlined in a presentation to The Results Group team that attracting and retaining top talent is the real challenge that CEO’s face. That in todays fast paced change, technology growth and globalisation one of the biggest strategic advantages can come from a  company culture that engages and challenges and creates great services, one that clients love and that staff love providing. No one can steal your team culture because it is unique.

A colleague of mine,  Bruce Cotterill spoke recently at an ASB Business Banking event and outlined why every year we have to be “20% better than last year just to stay still.” He meant as a company, as a leader, our products & services, team members personally, we all have to be 20% better each year. That way we stay ahead of the competition who is getting better each year. We stay ahead of the new competitive products that erode market share and we leverage technology instead of being drowned by its constant evolution.

Anthony Leighs (CEO and Founder of Leighs Construction) spoke to our Christchurch CEO Leadership Group about the importance of having a culture that delivers with Pride and Passion but is committed also to being excellent. Getting better and better is important the people he leads and they love being part of it.

So average is one thing every Company and Organisation (and CEO leading it) must be aware of. If an organisation is blind as to what clients really think, is not investing in future leaders and developing people and getting better then the end is probably not far out of sight.

Never do average. Be restless, challenge your team to be restless. What your story?

Leaders: The Genius Of Simple

Complexity

When I saw this Richard Branson quote I immediately sent it to several CEO’s that I have been working with over the past week. The reality of business today is that it is complex, fast paced and full on. The change, technology, innovation and changing global market place adds to complexity. The role of a leader is to constantly make the complex simple. To break things down into bite size chunks, to clearly identify the issues in amongst the “fog of war” so they can then be addressed.

One recent example. This week I was working with a leading NZ company, one that is very successful, growing fast, a Senior Leadership Team at the top of its game, working in the technical space. These guys can do amazing things in their field, professionally and are academically at the top of their game. As part of their strategy it became important to measure “users”. The conversation and debate around what a user is, how the various users could be measured, their usage weighted, the definition etc could have raged for hours. A real life example of a simple concept i.e. a user is someone who uses their product or service whether they pay for it or not, being made into a complex matter that could have stopped them doing something very simple and important.

The role of any leader is to quickly take the conversation the other way. To cut through the complexity and ensure the team understands the real issue. To quickly bring things to a logical and executable decision point. Time and time again businesses feel they are different or special so therefore the principles of research based best practice won’t apply to them.

Recently I was speaking to a group representing 15 Law firms. A mix of senior partners and their General Managers. I was discussing Target Markets and how any business needs to be able to identify their Target Market and design their products and services specifically for that market (not that they don’t do business with those outside that target market, they just don’t actively target them).

One said to me “Kendall you have to realise that we do things a little differently”, meaning that this stuff is all very well and good but it doesn’t apply to them because their work is different/complex/multifaceted/high trust with clients/very important etc. When I openly challenged this point we went on to have a great discussion and in actual fact this thinking not only absolutely applied to their industry it was badly lacking. To the point whereby most Law firms cannot even differentiate their point of difference. Most simply are “Great service, trusted, client focussed”. I’m not saying it is easy to have a defendable point of difference, but when you get one clearly defined it is of high value. It allows you to stand out and demonstrate to your market that you add a massive return on investment to them. Otherwise you compete on price…….and that sucks. Sadly most Companies and Industries think they are little bit different and therefore don’t apply some of the simple principles.

Leaders at the top of their game keep things simple, force clarity and help their people to make the complex simple. Ironically some of these skills are the least talked about, trained for and invested in.

Other Things You Might Find of Interest;

Listening Very Hard: The Voice of Your Customer (Link here)

Making Your Business Better (Link Here)

Leadership Lessons from 200 CEO’s (Link Here)

Listening Very Hard: The Voice of Your Customer

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As a Consulting Company that has a Customer Intimate Generic Strategy (i.e. we understand what our clients want and we work closely to deliver it the customised way they need it delivered) we survey the Business Leaders we work with every 6 months. It is important that we get better and better at Strategy, Executive Leader Coaching and most importantly our core business which is ensuring the plan gets executed. We need to know our clients well, support their CEO’s to lead change and to develop and grow their people. It is a high trust relationship because we get to see the best and the worst of what goes on inside their organisation. Referrals are the absolute lifeblood of our business and where most of our new business comes from.

The survey we use (and we recommend our clients use)  is the Net Promotor Score survey. You can google this and find a huge amount of information about this globally recognised best practice survey which measures client loyalty. Two simple anonymous questions asked by an independent party gives a massive amount of valuable information.

Question 1: On a scale of 1 – 10 (1 being never and 10 being always) how likely would you be to recommend xyz business to family or close friends. This gives a number.

Question 2: If the answer is 9 or 10: What is your reason for giving this number? This information is taken down as it is said (i.e. word for word) and gives all the things the business does well and in fact are the reasons they are loyal and will refer business.

Question 2: If the answer is 1 – 8: How could company xyz move your score closer to a 9 or 10? These answers will give all the information about what things need to improve before they will refer others. They are the development areas.

Using the numbers you then ignore all the 7 & 8 Scores (these are deemed as satisfied clients i.e. just as likely to refer as not). You calculate the % of 9 & 10’s (the promotors) and subtract the % of 1 – 6’s (the detractors). This gives a number between -100 and + 100. That is your Net Promotor Score. You can access benchmarking data to look at industry norms if you wish.

As a professional services Company working in a high trust position you would expect that the NPS score would be well into the positive numbers. Our NPS score had moved from + 56 to + 75 over a six month period. More significantly we had no detractors (rating 1 – 6) something we had never achieved before. So what did the survey tell us?

1. It gives me as CEO a lot of confidence that we deliver upon and exceed our client expectations.

2. It tells us that we are getting better at what we do.

3. It tells us that we have a stable and loyal client base that will refer and that we add massive value to their businesses.

4. It gives us confidence to tell our story and know that it is backed by our clients & based on good data.

5. We know exactly what it is that clients value most about our services and exactly what problems we solve for them.

6. It tells us what we need to work on over the next 6 months as a team (training and new skills/expertise) in order to take things to the next level.

7. It gives us valuable information and confidence around how we price our services.

Most of our clients introduce this survey over time and it is very valuable information. The businesses brave enough to own the “Voice of their Customer” will significantly out perform others in their industry because they know what they need to improve and innovate in order to grow client loyalty. It does take courage to do it. If you have detractors surveying 1 – 6 you can actually put a dollar amount on the revenue your business has at risk i.e. if you don’t do something to address those things they seek then you will eventually lose them as a client.

We owe a massive thanks to all our clients for taking part in this survey……..Thank you, thank you, thank you.

Have you surveyed your client loyalty? What did you learn?

Read more about owning the Voice of the Customer

Case study: Voice of the Customer Workshop (link here)

Own the Voice of the Customer…….just Own it!! (Link Here)